Tag: Education Leadership Administration Teaching Philosophy

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Personalized Professional Learning

It’s here! #CUE 16 and I’m looking forward to presenting the Future Gear of Personalizing Professional Learning. Click on the gears to learn more about creating a personalized approach to professional learning for your district.

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Interested in where to find Twitter chats, Blab conversations or blogs to follow? Click here for a listing of EdChats on Twitter or check out some hashtags such as #kidsdeservit, #TLAP, #caedchat, #edcamp, #NGSS, #CommonCore. Have something you want to learn about or a group of people you want to connect with? Just get on Twitter and see what you find when you add the hashtag. Looking for some blogs? Check out these recommendations by Edublogs and EdTech Magazine. Who should you follow on Facebook? Start with Edutopia, Elementary Librarian and the Buck Institute for Education as well as the authors you enjoy or professional organizations you belong to. Check out Joe Sanfelippo and Tony Sinais on Blab. Prefer a podcast? Take a look at the recommendations Edutopia has to offer. Start playing, start exploring and have fun creating your own personal learning plan.

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Has Your District Taken the Future Ready Pledge?

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The United States Department of Education with the backing of the White House launched the Future Ready Initiative a year ago in which superintendents have been asked to commit their districts to a culture of digital learning. To support districts in making this commitment #FutureReady has put together a robust support system including an interactive planning dashboard, a Future Ready Schools Framework and a multitude of industry partnerships. The resources are designed with intentionality to provide a strong vision for the future of education in the United States and as well as an actionable plan with supporting tools.

The first year of the Initiative brought 120 superintendent’s from across the United States together in the East Room of the White House. Summits were held across the United States bringing leadership teams together to connect and plan for 21st Century instruction in their schools based on the seven gears of the Future Ready Framework.

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The benefits of taking the pledge are many. Take a look at the FAQ to find out what could be in it for your district. Has the the superintendent of your district taken the pledge? If so, be sure to thank them and acknowledge their forward looking leadership. If not, share this opportunity with them and ask them to join this network of education leaders taking action to redefine the way we think about education.

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Be an Edu Rockstar

Screen Shot 2015-10-11 at 12.58.43 PMInterested in becoming an Edu Rockstar? CUE, Computer Using Educators, has been supporting educators in California in doing just this through Rock Star Camps for several years now and has recently taken the experience and the opportunity to become a Rock Star Teacher or Edu Leader to a whole new level. Under the direction of Jon Corippo, Director of Academic Innovation, CUE has introduced Black Label Rock Star Camps, TOSA Rock Star Camps and my most recent favorite CUE Rock Star Admin Camp.

The first Rock Star Admin. Camp was hosted at the Luke Skywalker Ranch, in the foothills of northern Marin County, home of Edutopia, and took attendees on a transformational three day Hero’s Journey.

The learning embraced a collaborative approach that brought innovative educators and those looking to become more innovative together in great discussions and sharing of resources that are guiding inspired practices happening in school districts throughout the State. Tim Goree, Director of Technology of the Fairfield- Suison School District, showed attendees that, “You can’t break the Google,” as he guided Edu Leaders in learning how to manage their district’s GAFE domain and other IT secrets. Eric Saibel, Assistant Principal at Hall Middle School, with his calm, understated style, brought humor, nature and inspiration to question doing business as usual. Mike Niehoff, with his fabulous, slightly offbeat sense of humor, that attendees will not forget, brought his passion for a student’s right to be provided with high quality and engaging learning to the forefront. Jennifer Kloczko, Principal at Natomas Charter School, took her parallel passion for high quality and inspiring staff meetings and professional development and got everyone dancing while also showing them how to run a meeting that keeps adult energy up and engagement high. Ramsey Mussallam, teacher extraordinaire at Sacred Heart Cathedral Preparatory and Ted Speaker, wowed everyone with examples of high interest, high rigor, high success instruction. Finally, Jon Corippo, who pulled the event together with his team and all their behind the scenes work. brought his usual high level of energy and no holds barred approach to introducing the administrators on hand to 21st Century tools that engage learners and develop real world technology skills.

Interested in becoming an Edu Rockstar Admin? If you answered yes, you’re already on your way. To become a Rockstar Administrator there really are only two requirements: 1) be willing to learn outside of your comfort zone, 2) be willing to “fail” (first attempt in learning) as you learn and redefine your professional practice with an infusion of innovation. These two qualities embed what Carol Dweck refers to as an Open Mind Set. With an open mind set, there are no limits on your ability to become an innovative and transformational leader, but you will want to connect with other like-minded leaders, not only in education, but in other industries as well. The 21st Century workforce whether it be business, Nascar or the military are using innovative approaches to redefine the way they do business. There is a lot we can learn from other industries to influence our personal leadership practice and expectations as well as our expectations of how schools are educating students and what skills students are graduating with.

As you begin practicing to become a Rockstar Leader be sure that you’re 1) engaging with others through social media, 2) be aware of what your personal brand online looks like, 3) create and maintain a blog, 4) get on Twitter, 5) participate in chats. As you develop your Rockstar skills and presence be sure to add 1) create a Google+ account 2) participate in a Google Hangout, 3) post to instagram 4) develop a Voxer group to collaborate with. Now that you’ve created these resources for yourself, create them for your organization. Connect, connect, connect and be a Rockstar!

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“Stepping Very Much Away from the Traditional”

I enjoy starting my mornings with a look at my Twitter feed. There’s always something there that is intellectually stimulating, thought provoking and entertaining. Some posts stand out more than others and some continue to resonate well after the initial reading of the post. Eric Saibel, assistant principal at Hall Middle School and author of the blog Principals in Training, shared the video A Tour of Copenhagen’s Noma with Chef Rene Redzepi this morning. The analogy of the chef’s observation of his professional field were stunningly similar to those of the education profession.

The story of Chef Rene’s kitchen begins as he describes the kitchen’s reliance on local resources, not unlike the classroom and the LCAP, as well as changes that have been implemented in his kitchen the past couple of years, not unlike changes occurring in our classrooms as the impact and possibilities available through the use of 21st Century tools are continuing to work their way into classroom pedagogy. There is a lesson in Chef Rene’s insight on the importance of the design of the working environment to support openness, light and creativity that can have a powerful impact on the learning environments we create for our students.

We almost ruined our own trade by making it too tough, too hard… People are entering our trade for the wrong reasons and are surprised when they work 85 hours and then they feel tired one day and they’re out. We need to change this.”

It is important to employees in all industries that they feel valued and invested in, yet it is not uncommon to see teachers’ passion for education being taken advantage of as evidenced by the recent economic downturn in which many of our schools survived because of the furlough days and pay reductions taken by the professionals in our field. A July 2014 report from the Alliance for Excellence in Education showed an annual turnover rate of 20% for teachers in the education profession correlating to 1 in 5 teachers leaving the profession every year. While the reasons vary among those leaving the profession, the most often cited reason is “dissatisfaction with working conditions.” This high rate of turnover is costly bringing with it a national annual price tag $2.2 billion to replace the vacated positions.

“We work a lot in the trade. There’s no way around it. You’re going to work your ass off and so do we, but with a little less of the pressure…”

There continues to be a myth that has run through generations that educators are done by three, have weekends off and enjoy long summer vacations. Every teacher will tell you about the late meetings they stay for, the committees they serve on, the lessons they plan and the papers they grade at home during the evenings and on weekends as well as the work they do over the summer to prepare for the upcoming year and investing in their own professional development. Yes, educators work their asses off which makes Chef Rene’s next quote also fitting to the industry.

“It’s a business where you work so much for very little money that it needs to be very inspiring, it needs to be very cool. It needs to be family. It needs to be a tight team.”

What would happen if we truly invested in the on-going professional development of educators allowing teachers to take the lead in the decision making of the direction of their professional growth? What if we designed classrooms and teachers lounges to support 21st century tools? Would they become, as Chef Rene describes of his staff, more confident? Would they make more decisions, be less afraid to try new things, to be creative and innovative? What can we do to make our industry/our passion cool? How do we create tight teams that feel like a close and supportive family so that members don’t want to leave?

“It’s the cook that cooks the food that creates the magic it’s not the recipe.”

translated…

It’s the teacher that the teaches the lesson that creates the magic, it’s not the script.

There are quotes throughout the interview that are open to analogies with the education profession. I hope you enjoy watching the video, consider sharing your favorite quote and it’s analogy to our profession and your ideas for making life in education “cool” so that we grow together as we educate each group of students that come through our classrooms.

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Tools of the Professionally Connected

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My Professional Learning Network continues to grow and I’m loving it! I noticed on my Twitter profile page today that I’ve been active on Twitter since April 16, 2011 – four years. Four years, 4,674 tweets, 1,763 followers, 1,760 following, 3,079 favorites, eight lists and numerous weekly edchats. While my venture into the PLN began with Twitter and Twitter continues to be my favorite source for connecting with like minded professionals and for professional learning, I’ve been enjoying my Google+ and Linkedin Connections as well and have mostly recently added Voxer to the mix.

Voxer has added a whole new element to professional learning and relationship building with colleagues who share the same passion for education, technology and leadership. Jon Corippo (@jcorippo) recently introduced me to the Rule of 150 which originated with anthropologist Robin Dunbar and was made more widely known in Malcolm Gladwell’s book Tipping Point. The Rule of 150 is based on the premise that 150 is the threshold for the number of relationships we are able to maintain within any subgroup. So, while I love the growing numbers of my Twitter PLN, I also know that my regular interactions are with a much smaller subset of followers.

Screen Shot 2015-04-06 at 7.33.26 PMVoxer, which allows users to send texts, voicemails and pictures has been a great tool for breaking down this larger network into more manageable subgroups. While this tool is still relatively new to me, I’m enjoying the more specific and funnier conversations that can be had with a smaller group that also isn’t posted publicly on the web. I’ve been able to connect with a subset of of innovative school administrators doing great work around the country, empowering teachers and having a blast engaging students. I’ve been able to connect with a subset of female education leaders who let the girl and the bling shine through in this venue. Next, I’m hoping to connect our SLO CUE professional network in some smaller ongoing conversations around the great work teachers are doing in local classrooms and finally I’m looking forward to trying Voxer out with family as we share pictures and voice messages and take our current texting conversations to the next level.

I invite you, the reader, to check out Voxer on your mobile device and share ideas for using the app both professionally and personally.

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An Observation: A Key Difference between a Son’s E-learning and his Mom’s E-learning

imgres-1My own e-learning begins fairly early in the morning and is often a large part of my overall day. I get up before the rest of my family every morning, grab coffee and dive into my email. My inbox is filled with professional articles, blogs and ed. tech resources. Some of my favorites include: Edutopia, EdReach, Seth Godin, Emerging EdTech and Ron Edmondson. I throw in a little morning humor in there with Andertoons as well.

I’m an education “learning nerd.” Not only do I love the profession of being an educator, but I love to learn! The advent of the internet, online courses, learning modules and articles, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and email have been a blessing to my learning habit. On the flip side of my joy in having learning just a click or couple of taps away is the need to find balance in life. I make a concentrated effort to put my digital tools aside when my family gets up or the clock lets me know it’s time to get ready for work. I do however look forward to when I can get back to my inbox and click on the next article to read, persuse the posts in my Twitter feed or take a look at what has been posted in the various Google+ communities I subscribe to.

There have been times when I’ve reflected on the idea of the learning being somewhat superficial or cursory and not “good learning.”  However, the topics I am really interested in are ones that I spend dedicated time with, studying deeper and accessing further resources. The cursory learning is a bonus as it gives me an idea of what else is out there that is of interest to others and also gives me a conversational knowledge that is good for connecting with others.

I suspect that other adult learners who engage in online learning would have similar responses to this type of a reflection regarding their online learning experiences. I also suspect our school age students are more likely to get distracted though. While I may sometimes veer towards a game of Jelly Splash

IMG_2109to take a break, my lives tend to run out quickly and I am able to refocus.

My son however, is taking an online driver’s education course. I noticed him working intently this afternoon, took a look at the computer screen, saw the module he was working on and made sure not to bother him so he could concentrate. Yet, when I returned to the computer to do some work for my Leading Edge Certification in online/blended learning,I was greeted by the following image:

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It turns out he had finished the unit we had agreed he would complete by the end of the day, but being at the computer gave him quick and easy access to playing games while his parents thought he was studying. He is a pretty typical teenager and I suspect most students his age would do the same thing. It’s not such a big deal over the summer, but as it gets later into a school night, the temptation to reward oneself for finishing an assignment could, and I know has in our home, result in some unintended late nights.

As we teach our students how to learn using the internet and Web 2.0 tools as well as how to become good digital citizens, we also need to guide them and teach them how to create balance in their lives to be sure they eat their meals away from the computer, engage in regular exercise, get together with friends face to face, and moderate their online gaming and socialization. These have the potential to turn into a battle of wills on the home front as watching too much tv was for my generation. Yet as educators, we can support our students and their families by sharing models of guidelines for home use of the computer for learning and entertainment. As the learning environment continues to shift towards increased use of digital resources, guidelines will need to be adjusted, but they are an important part of the overall education of our children as well as adult learners.

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Implementing a Blended Learning Approach to Professional Development

Screen Shot 2014-07-19 at 1.05.00 PMAs an administrator with responsibility for providing professional development (PD) for certificated and classified staff,  I had the opportunity to be part of a team that implemented a blended model approach to PD the last few years. Working with a county office of education, I had staff located throughout a 50 mile radius. In addition to the challenges that come with being separated by so many miles, staff also had different areas of expertise. While there are many similarities to good teaching across specific student populations, there are also distinct differences to be found in best practices for students who are deaf or hard of hearing, visually impaired, emotionally disturbed or diagnosed with autism. By implementing a blended learning approach to professional development, staff were able to engage in more personalized learning focusing on skills and curriculum that would best support the success of their students. Additionally, this provided staff with greater flexibility to engage in learning and developing their individual areas of expertise at times that worked best for them. It also provided staff who were interested in engaging in further development, resources to guide their learning.

This blended model of professional development incorporated the study of online modules, video, Google presentations, Google forms and Google documents. Teachers and classified staff whose expertise was being developed in supporting students with moderate to severe handicaps chose evidence based practices to study from AIM (Autism Internet Modules. Teachers chose two practices a year that all staff would study and one to two evidence based practices (EBPs) that they would study individually. This course of professional development was supported by two monthly in person meetings.

One meeting was a presentation style lecture led by a guest speaker, expert in developmental disabilities, and the other meeting was a small group gathering with a specific monthly format that allowed teachers to share what was working and not working within their practice in addition to sharing examples and materials from EBPs being used in their classrooms. This approach allowed for a shared base of instructional knowledge on the part of all staff while also allowing teachers the opportunity to develop expertise in areas that were of specific interest to them. Classified staff were provided with the access to the same materials as certificated staff, were invited to the larger monthly meetings and were provided with follow up training by the classroom teacher that focused on the specific implementation of evidence based practices that supported their classroom instruction.

As individual teacher expertise began to grow, a coaching component was added to this model. When a teacher would develop an interest in an area that a colleague had expertise in or encountered a student or situation that would benefit from a another teacher’s area of expertise, release time would be provided for the two staff members to conduct observations of each other’s classrooms and to work together to incorporate the new evidence based practice into the classroom’s instructional model.

In addition to the internet modules, Google presentations and videos were created and presented via an online format. For example, staff studied the evidence based practice of video modeling this past year. The video modeling presentation was was made available for all staff to view and review as per their preference. The presentation  was easily modified to offer suggestions applicable to general education classroom instruction and to provide a guide to consider when creating video models. This presentation was supported with researched based articles for staff to read as well as steps to guide the process of creating a video model for students. The unit ended with a brief reflective assessment and submission of videos that were shared with all staff to use as fit their needs.

The outcome of implementing a blended learning model was a highly skilled and motivated staff who had confidence in their specific areas of expertise, foundational knowledge in over 30 evidence based instructional practices as well as in person and digital resources to access to supplement further learning. Teachers engaged in higher order thinking skills as they evaluated which evidence based practices their students would benefit from the most. They synthesized their knowledge to design instructional programs that incorporated these strategies into the curriculum while creating materials based on the practices they had learned. Additionally, staff began to create video models to support increased student learning.

The blended approach solved several of the logistical challenges of having staff spread across such a significant geographical area. It engaged staff as adult learners, provided flexibility for staff to engage in learning at their convenience while also capitalizing on their professional knowledge of their students’ needs and interests. This supported the implementation of instructional strategies to maximize student’s individual success. Added bonuses to using 2.0 tools and having materials available on the web were that parents and substitute teachers started to access the resources as well. This allowed for greater than expected fidelity of instruction when substitute teachers were in the classroom, particularly when staff was out for coaching. All in all, the implementation of the blended learning model to support professional development proved to be a resounding success with a positive impact on student learning.

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A Moral Responsibility

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As educators it is important that we have a clearly defined personal philosophy of education. While this seems like a straightforward and obvious statement, defining that philosophy, allowing for it to develop with our experiences, articulating and defending it require careful thought. As I reflect on my personal philosophy of education, I see how easy it is to jump into the catch phrases of, “I believe all children can learn,” “I believe all children should be able to attend a safe and welcoming school,” and yes, these are parts of the ethical considerations, but if we were to apply Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to this study, these statements would fall at the foundational level of meeting the physiological, safety and belonging needs.

It is in looking at the level of self-actualization including morality, creativity, spontaneity, problem solving, prejudice and acceptance that one’s true philosophy can be found. Thus stated, I believe we have a moral obligation to presume competence on the part of all students. While the American educational system espouses a desire for higher levels of achievement, the system is set up to support mediocrity. It is imperative that we meet learners where they are. It is essential to engage the gifted student in ways that challenge them to grow intellectually in ways that the student finds engaging and relevant I find it heart-breaking that the Thiel Fellowship http://www.thielfellowship.org/ is where our most gifted students have to go to reach their potential. It is through dropping out of college and our educational system that their gifts are being developed. I am grateful that Peter Thiel has created this fellowship and has taken on this moral responsibility and saddened that our society and legislature function in a system so focused on a standardized process that we do not support the innovators of our society.

At the same time, we also have and equal responsibility to students who are labeled as disabled. There are gifts and far higher levels of understanding among these students who do not blend or express themselves in non-traditional methods of communication than most give them credit for. There is a moral obligation to assist all members of society in finding and providing the means for them to express their voice and to engage their minds and bodies to reach their highest levels of potential.

The importance of combining both the art and the science of teaching as well as the research based with the innovative cannot be understated. It should not be either or. Education has an obligation to be creative, to combine the planned with the spontaneous, to let go of pre-conceived notions of learning, particularly those designed around a system designed for the industrial era, to let go of our prejudices and be open to considering the multitude of modalities available to engage, teach and inspire.